CIPT Exam Questions – Certified Information Privacy Technologist

The Certified Information Privacy Technologist (CIPT) certification, developed by the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), validates your knowledge of privacy-related issues and practices in the context of the design and implementation of information and communication technologies. PassQuestion provides the latest CIPT Exam Questions to help you best prepare for your test and pass your Certified Information Privacy Technologist exam successfully in your first time.

CIPT Exam Questions – Certified Information Privacy Technologist

1. What would be an example of an organization transferring the risks associated with a data breach?

 
 
 
 

2. Which of the following is considered a client-side IT risk?

 
 
 
 

3. SCENARIO

Carol was a U.S.-based glassmaker who sold her work at art festivals. She kept things simple by only accepting cash and personal checks.

As business grew, Carol couldn’t keep up with demand, and traveling to festivals became burdensome. Carol opened a small boutique and hired Sam to run it while she worked in the studio. Sam was a natural salesperson, and business doubled. Carol told Sam, “I don’t know what you are doing, but keep doing it!”

But months later, the gift shop was in chaos. Carol realized that Sam needed help so she hired Jane, who had business expertise and could handle the back-office tasks. Sam would continue to focus on sales. Carol gave Jane a few weeks to get acquainted with the artisan craft business, and then scheduled a meeting for the three of them to discuss Jane’s first impressions.

At the meeting, Carol could not wait to hear Jane’s thoughts, but she was unprepared for what Jane had to say. “Carol, I know that he doesn’t realize it, but some of Sam’s efforts to increase sales have put you in a vulnerable position. You are not protecting customers’ personal information like you should.”

Sam said, “I am protecting our information. I keep it in the safe with our bank deposit. It’s only a list of customers’ names, addresses and phone numbers that I get from their checks before I deposit them. I contact them when you finish a piece that I think they would like. That’s the only information I have! The only other thing I do is post photos and information about your work on the photo sharing site that I use with family and friends. I provide my email address and people send me their information if they want to see more of your work. Posting online really helps sales, Carol. In fact, the only complaint I hear is about having to come into the shop to make a purchase.”

Carol replied, “Jane, that doesn’t sound so bad. Could you just fix things and help us to post even more online?”

“I can,” said Jane. “But it’s not quite that simple. I need to set up a new program to make sure that we follow the best practices in data management. And I am concerned for our customers. They should be able to manage how we use their personal information. We also should develop a social media strategy.”

Sam and Jane worked hard during the following year. One of the decisions they made was to contract with an outside vendor to manage online sales. At the end of the year, Carol shared some exciting news. “Sam and Jane, you have done such a great job that one of the biggest names in the glass business wants to buy us out! And Jane, they want to talk to you about merging all of our customer and vendor information with theirs beforehand.”

What type of principles would be the best guide for Jane’s ideas regarding a new data management program?

 
 
 
 

4. SCENARIO

Carol was a U.S.-based glassmaker who sold her work at art festivals. She kept things simple by only accepting cash and personal checks.

As business grew, Carol couldn’t keep up with demand, and traveling to festivals became burdensome. Carol opened a small boutique and hired Sam to run it while she worked in the studio. Sam was a natural salesperson, and business doubled. Carol told Sam, “I don’t know what you are doing, but keep doing it!”

But months later, the gift shop was in chaos. Carol realized that Sam needed help so she hired Jane, who had business expertise and could handle the back-office tasks. Sam would continue to focus on sales. Carol gave Jane a few weeks to get acquainted with the artisan craft business, and then scheduled a meeting for the three of them to discuss Jane’s first impressions.

At the meeting, Carol could not wait to hear Jane’s thoughts, but she was unprepared for what Jane had to say. “Carol, I know that he doesn’t realize it, but some of Sam’s efforts to increase sales have put you in a vulnerable position. You are not protecting customers’ personal information like you should.”

Sam said, “I am protecting our information. I keep it in the safe with our bank deposit. It’s only a list of customers’ names, addresses and phone numbers that I get from their checks before I deposit them. I contact them when you finish a piece that I think they would like. That’s the only information I have! The only other thing I do is post photos and information about your work on the photo sharing site that I use with family and friends. I provide my email address and people send me their information if they want to see more of your work. Posting online really helps sales, Carol. In fact, the only complaint I hear is about having to come into the shop to make a purchase.”

Carol replied, “Jane, that doesn’t sound so bad. Could you just fix things and help us to post even more online?”

‘I can,” said Jane. “But it’s not quite that simple. I need to set up a new program to make sure that we follow the best practices in data management. And I am concerned for our customers. They should be able to manage how we use their personal information. We also should develop a social media strategy.”

Sam and Jane worked hard during the following year. One of the decisions they made was to contract with an outside vendor to manage online sales. At the end of the year, Carol shared some exciting news. “Sam and Jane, you have done such a great job that one of the biggest names in the glass business wants to buy us out! And Jane, they want to talk to you about merging all of our customer and vendor information with theirs beforehand.”

Which regulator has jurisdiction over the shop’s data management practices?

 
 
 
 

5. SCENARIO

Carol was a U.S.-based glassmaker who sold her work at art festivals. She kept things simple by only accepting cash and personal checks.

As business grew, Carol couldn’t keep up with demand, and traveling to festivals became burdensome. Carol opened a small boutique and hired Sam to run it while she worked in the studio. Sam was a natural salesperson, and business doubled. Carol told Sam, “I don’t know what you are doing, but keep doing it!”

But months later, the gift shop was in chaos. Carol realized that Sam needed help so she hired Jane, who had business expertise and could handle the back-office tasks. Sam would continue to focus on sales. Carol gave Jane a few weeks to get acquainted with the artisan craft business, and then scheduled a meeting for the three of them to discuss Jane’s first impressions.

At the meeting, Carol could not wait to hear Jane’s thoughts, but she was unprepared for what Jane had to say. “Carol, I know that he doesn’t realize it, but some of Sam’s efforts to increase sales have put you in a vulnerable position. You are not protecting customers’ personal information like you should.”

Sam said, “I am protecting our information. I keep it in the safe with our bank deposit. It’s only a list of customers’ names, addresses and phone numbers that I get from their checks before I deposit them. I contact them when you finish a piece that I think they would like. That’s the only information I have! The only other thing I do is post photos and information about your work on the photo sharing site that I use with family and friends. I provide my email address and people send me their information if they want to see more of your work. Posting online really helps sales, Carol. In fact, the only complaint I hear is about having to come into the shop to make a purchase.”

Carol replied, “Jane, that doesn’t sound so bad. Could you just fix things and help us to post even more online?”

‘I can,” said Jane. “But it’s not quite that simple. I need to set up a new program to make sure that we follow the best practices in data management. And I am concerned for our customers. They should be able to manage how we use their personal information. We also should develop a social media strategy.”

Sam and Jane worked hard during the following year. One of the decisions they made was to contract with an outside vendor to manage online sales. At the end of the year, Carol shared some exciting news. “Sam and Jane, you have done such a great job that one of the biggest names in the glass business wants to buy us out! And Jane, they want to talk to you about merging all of our customer and vendor information with theirs beforehand.”

When initially collecting personal information from customers, what should Jane be guided by?

 
 
 
 

6. A key principle of an effective privacy policy is that it should be?

 
 
 
 

7. What was the first privacy framework to be developed?

 
 
 
 

8. Which of the following became a foundation for privacy principles and practices of countries and organizations across the globe?

 
 
 
 

9. SCENARIO

Kyle is a new security compliance manager who will be responsible for coordinating and executing controls to ensure compliance with the company’s information security policy and industry standards. Kyle is also new to the company, where collaboration is a core value. On his first day of new-hire orientation, Kyle’s schedule included participating in meetings and observing work in the IT and compliance departments.

Kyle spent the morning in the IT department, where the CIO welcomed him and explained that her department was responsible for IT governance. The CIO and Kyle engaged in a conversation about the importance of identifying meaningful IT governance metrics. Following their conversation, the CIO introduced Kyle to Ted and Barney. Ted is implementing a plan to encrypt data at the transportation level of the organization’s wireless network. Kyle would need to get up to speed on the project and suggest ways to monitor effectiveness once the implementation was complete. Barney explained that his short-term goals are to establish rules governing where data can be placed and to minimize the use of offline data storage.

Kyle spent the afternoon with Jill, a compliance specialist, and learned that she was exploring an initiative for a compliance program to follow self-regulatory privacy principles. Thanks to a recent internship, Kyle had some experience in this area and knew where Jill could find some support. Jill also shared results of the company’s privacy risk assessment, noting that the secondary use of personal information was considered a high risk.

By the end of the day, Kyle was very excited about his new job and his new company. In fact, he learned about an open position for someone with strong qualifications and experience with access privileges, project standards board approval processes, and application-level obligations, and couldn’t wait to recommend his friend Ben who would be perfect for the job.

Ted’s implementation is most likely a response to what incident?

 
 
 
 

10. SCENARIO

Kyle is a new security compliance manager who will be responsible for coordinating and executing controls to ensure compliance with the company’s information security policy and industry standards. Kyle is also new to the company, where collaboration is a core value. On his first day of new-hire orientation, Kyle’s schedule included participating in meetings and observing work in the IT and compliance departments.

Kyle spent the morning in the IT department, where the CIO welcomed him and explained that her department was responsible for IT governance. The CIO and Kyle engaged in a conversation about the importance of identifying meaningful IT governance metrics. Following their conversation, the CIO introduced Kyle to Ted and Barney. Ted is implementing a plan to encrypt data at the transportation level of the organization’s wireless network. Kyle would need to get up to speed on the project and suggest ways to monitor effectiveness once the implementation was complete. Barney explained that his short-term goals are to establish rules governing where data can be placed and to minimize the use of offline data storage.

Kyle spent the afternoon with Jill, a compliance specialist, and learned that she was exploring an initiative for a compliance program to follow self-regulatory privacy principles. Thanks to a recent internship, Kyle had some experience in this area and knew where Jill could find some support. Jill also shared results of the company’s privacy risk assessment, noting that the secondary use of personal information was considered a high risk.

By the end of the day, Kyle was very excited about his new job and his new company. In fact, he learned about an open position for someone with strong qualifications and experience with access privileges, project standards board approval processes, and application-level obligations, and couldn’t wait to recommend his friend Ben who would be perfect for the job.

Which of the following should Kyle recommend to Jill as the best source of support for her initiative?

 
 
 
 

11. SCENARIO

Kyle is a new security compliance manager who will be responsible for coordinating and executing controls to ensure compliance with the company’s information security policy and industry standards. Kyle is also new to the company, where collaboration is a core value. On his first day of new-hire orientation, Kyle’s schedule included participating in meetings and observing work in the IT and compliance departments.

Kyle spent the morning in the IT department, where the CIO welcomed him and explained that her department was responsible for IT governance. The CIO and Kyle engaged in a conversation about the importance of identifying meaningful IT governance metrics. Following their conversation, the CIO introduced Kyle to Ted and Barney. Ted is implementing a plan to encrypt data at the transportation level of the organization’s wireless network. Kyle would need to get up to speed on the project and suggest ways to monitor effectiveness once the implementation was complete. Barney explained that his short-term goals are to establish rules governing where data can be placed and to minimize the use of offline data storage.

Kyle spent the afternoon with Jill, a compliance specialist, and learned that she was exploring an initiative for a compliance program to follow self-regulatory privacy principles. Thanks to a recent internship, Kyle had some experience in this area and knew where Jill could find some support. Jill also shared results of the company’s privacy risk assessment, noting that the secondary use of personal information was considered a high risk.

By the end of the day, Kyle was very excited about his new job and his new company. In fact, he learned about an open position for someone with strong qualifications and experience with access privileges, project standards board approval processes, and application-level obligations, and couldn’t wait to recommend his friend Ben who would be perfect for the job.

Which data practice is Barney most likely focused on improving?

 
 
 
 

12. What is the main function of a breach response center?

 
 
 
 

13. Which is NOT a suitable action to apply to data when the retention period ends?

 
 
 
 

14. What is the distinguishing feature of asymmetric encryption?

 
 
 
 

15. What is the most important requirement to fulfill when transferring data out of an organization?

 
 
 
 

16. Which activity would best support the principle of data quality?

 
 
 
 

17. Which Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) privacy protection principle encourages an organization to obtain an individual s consent before transferring personal information?

 
 
 
 

18. Granting data subjects the right to have data corrected, amended, or deleted describes?

 
 
 
 

19. What is a mistake organizations make when establishing privacy settings during the development of applications?

 
 
 
 

20. Which of the following suggests the greatest degree of transparency?

 
 
 
 

CIPP-E Exam Questions - Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E)

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